Schematic of light-induced formation of Weyl points in a Dirac material of ZrTe5. Jigang Wang and collaborators report how coherently twisted lattice motion by laser pulses, i.e., a phononic switch, can control the crystal inversion symmetry and photogenerate giant low dissipation current with an exceptional ballistic transport protected by induced […]

MIT and Harvard researchers have studied how elementary units of magnetism, called spins (the black arrows), move around and interact with other spins, in a chain of single atoms (the colored spheres). The background shows a real image of the spins, revealing a high contrast periodic modulation of the blue […]

An electrical current excites the superposition of two magnons with linear polarization (indicated by the red and blue arrows). Subsequently, energy is transported through the antiferromagnetic insulator. This can be detected as electrical voltage. Credit: Ill./©: Andrew Ross, JGU Physicists use antiferromagnetic rust to carry information over long distances at […]

Magnon excitation. Credit: Daria Sokol/MIPT Press Office Scientists Excite Magnons in Nanostructures With Laser Pulses Physicists from MIPT and the Russian Quantum Center, joined by colleagues from Saratov State University and Michigan Technological University, have demonstrated new methods for controlling spin waves in nanostructured bismuth iron garnet films via short laser […]

Vibrations in a lattice: This is an illustration of quantized lattice vibrations in a material, where the word ‘quantized’ is used to mean that only certain frequencies of vibrations are allowed. In this animation, you can see how this vibration propagates through the structure of a one-dimensional (1D) chain of […]

Microscope image, recorded using a scanning tunneling microscope, of the detector device (inside the dashed rectangle), connected to a wire consisting of nine magnetic atoms. Credit: TU Delft Researchers at Delft University of Technology have developed a sensor that is only 11 atoms in size. The sensor is capable of […]

These balloon-and-disc shapes represent an electron orbital — a fuzzy electron cloud around an atom’s nucleus — in two different orientations. Scientists hope to someday use variations in the orientations of orbitals as the 0s and 1s needed to make computations and store information in computer memories, a system known […]